// by Arthur Eddington | Philosophy Department at St. Anselm College //

There is no essential distinction between scientific measures and the measures of the senses. In either case our acquaintance with the external world comes to us through material channels; the observer's body may be regarded as part of his laboratory equipment.

We have found a strange footprint on the shores of the unknown. We have devised profound theories, one after another, to account for its origins. At last, we have succeeded in reconstructing the creature that made the footprint. And lo! It is our own.

An ocean traveler has even more vividly the impression that the ocean is made of waves than that it is made of water.

A society of learned fishes would probably agree that phenomena were best described from the point of view of a fish at rest in the ocean.

It is impossible to trap modern physics into predicting anything with perfect determinism because it deals with probabilities from the outset.

It would probably be wiser to nail up over the door of the new quantum theory a notice, 'Structural alterations in progress--No admittance except on business', and particularly to warn the doorkeeper to keep out prying philosophers.

It is in the external world that the four dimensions are united -- not the relations of the external world to the individual which constitute his direct acquaintance with space and time.

Schrodinger's wave-mechanics is not a physical theory, but a dodge -- and a very good dodge too.

Schrodinger's theory is now enjoying the full tide of popularity, partly because of intrinsic merit, but also, I suspect, partly because it is the only one of the three that is simple enough to be misunderstood.

We do not defend the validity of seeing beauty in a natural landscape; we accept with gratitude the fact that we are so endowed as to see it that way.